Chengcheng Hu
Director, Biostatistics - Phoenix Campus
Professor, BIO5 Institute
Professor, Public Health
Professor, Statistics-GIDP
Primary Department
Department Affiliations
(520) 626-9308
Work Summary
Chengcheng Hu has worked on a broad range of areas including cancer, occupational health, HIV/AIDS, and aging. He has extensive collaborative research in conducting methodological research in the areas of survival analysis, longitudinal data, high-dimensional data, and measurement error. His current methodological interest, arising from studies of viral and human genetics and biomarkers, is to develop innovative methods to investigate the relationship between high-dimensional information and longitudinal outcomes or survival endpoints.
Research Interest
Chengcheng Hu, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor, Public Health and Director, Biostatistics, Phoenix campus at the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona. He is also Director of the Biometry Core on the Chemoprevention of Skin Cancer Project at the University of Arizona Cancer Center. Hu has worked on multiple federal grants in a broad range of areas including cancer, occupational health, HIV/AIDS, and aging. In addition to extensive experience in collaborative research, he has conducted methodological research in the areas of survival analysis, longitudinal data, high-dimensional data, and measurement error. His current methodological interest, arising from studies of viral and human genetics and biomarkers, is to develop innovative methods to investigate the relationship between high-dimensional information and longitudinal outcomes or survival endpoints. Hu joined the UA Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health in 2008. Prior to this he was an assistant professor of Biostatistics at the Harvard School of Public Health from 2002 to 2008. While at Harvard, he also served as senior statistician in the Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group (PACTG) and the International Maternal Pediatric Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials Group (IMPAACT). Hu received his Ph.D. and M.S. in Biostatistics from the University of Washington and a M.A. in Mathematics from the Johns Hopkins University.

Publications

Vasquez, M. M., Hu, C., Roe, D. J., Chen, Z., Halonen, M., & Guerra, S. (2016). Least absolute shrinkage and selection operator type methods for the identification of serum biomarkers of overweight and obesity: simulation and application. BMC medical research methodology, 16(1), 154.
BIO5 Collaborators
Zhao Chen, Stefano Guerra, Chengcheng Hu

The study of circulating biomarkers and their association with disease outcomes has become progressively complex due to advances in the measurement of these biomarkers through multiplex technologies. The Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO) is a data analysis method that may be utilized for biomarker selection in these high dimensional data. However, it is unclear which LASSO-type method is preferable when considering data scenarios that may be present in serum biomarker research, such as high correlation between biomarkers, weak associations with the outcome, and sparse number of true signals. The goal of this study was to compare the LASSO to five LASSO-type methods given these scenarios.

Huang, S., Chengcheng, H., Bell, M., Billheimer, D., Guerra, S., Roe, D., Monica, V., & Bedrick, E. (2018). Regularized Continuous-Time Markov Model via Elastic Net. Biometrics.
BIO5 Collaborators
Dean Billheimer, Stefano Guerra, Chengcheng Hu
Poplin, G. S., Miller, H., Sottile, J., Hu, C., Hill, J. R., & Burgess, J. L. (2013). Enhancing severe injury surveillance: The association between severe injury events and fatalities in US coal mines. Journal of Safety Research, 44(1), 31-35.
BIO5 Collaborators
Jefferey L Burgess, Chengcheng Hu
Dickinson, S. E., Janda, J., Criswell, J., Blohm-Mangone, K., Olson, E. R., Liu, Z., Barber, C., Rusche, J. J., Petricoin, E., Calvert, V., Einspahr, J. G., Dickinson, J. E., Stratton, S. P., Curiel-Lewandrowski, C., Saboda, K., Hu, C., Bode, A. M., Dong, Z., Alberts, D. S., & Bowden, G. T. (2016). Inhibition of Akt Enhances the Chemopreventive Effects of Topical Rapamycin in Mouse Skin. Cancer prevention research (Philadelphia, Pa.).
BIO5 Collaborators
Clara N Curiel, Chengcheng Hu

The PI3Kinase/Akt/mTOR pathway has important roles in cancer development for multiple tumor types, including UV-induced non-melanoma skin cancer. Immunosuppressed populations are at increased risk of aggressive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Individuals who are treated with rapamycin, (sirolimus, a classical mTOR inhibitor) have significantly decreased rates of developing new cutaneous SCCs compared to those that receive traditional immunosuppression. However, systemic rapamycin use can lead to significant adverse events. Here we explored the use of topical rapamycin as a chemopreventive agent in the context of solar simulated light (SSL)-induced skin carcinogenesis. In SKH-1 mice, topical rapamycin treatment decreased tumor yields when applied after completion of 15 weeks of SSL exposure compared to controls. However, applying rapamycin during SSL exposure for 15 weeks, and continuing for 10 weeks after UV treatment, increased tumor yields. We also examined whether a combinatorial approach might result in more significant tumor suppression by rapamycin. We validated that rapamycin causes increased Akt (S473) phosphorylation in the epidermis after SSL, and show for the first time that this dysregulation can be inhibited in vivo by a selective PDK1/Akt inhibitor, PHT-427. Combining rapamycin with PHT-427 on tumor prone skin additively caused a significant reduction of tumor multiplicity compared to vehicle controls. Our findings indicate that patients taking rapamycin should avoid sun exposure, and that combining topical mTOR inhibitors and Akt inhibitors may be a viable chemoprevention option for individuals at high risk for cutaneous SCC.

Burgess, J. L., Duncan, M. D., Hu, C., Littau, S. R., Caseman, D., Kurzius-Spencer, M., Davis-Gorman, G., & McDonagh, P. F. (2012). Acute cardiovascular effects of firefighting and active cooling during rehabilitation. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 54(11), 1413-1420.
BIO5 Collaborators
Jefferey L Burgess, Chengcheng Hu