Scott B Going

Scott B Going

Department Head, Nutritional Sciences
Professor, BIO5 Institute
Professor, Nutritional Sciences
Professor, Physiological Sciences - GIDP
Professor, Physiology
Professor, Public Health
Primary Department
Department Affiliations
Contact
(520) 626-3432

Work Summary

Work Summary
Scott Going is an expert in models and methods for assessment of changes in body composition during growth, and with aging, and is currently investigating the effects of chronic exercise versus hormone replacement therapy on bone, soft tissue composition and muscle strength in postmenopausal women, as well as the role of exercise in obesity prevention in children.

Research Interest

Research Interest
Current projects include:The Bone, Estrogen and Strength Training (BEST) study, a randomized prospective study of the effects of hormone replacement therapy on bone mineral density, soft tissue composition, and muscle strength in postmenopausal women (National Institutes of Health). The Profile-based Internet-linked Obesity Treatment study (PILOT), a randomized study of internet support for weight maintenance after weight loss in peri-menopausal women (National Institutes of Health). The Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls (TAAG) study, a multi-center, school-based activity trial designed to prevent the usual decline in physical activity in adolescent girls (National Institutes of Health). The Adequate Calcium Today (ACT) study, a randomized multi-center study of a behavioral intervention to promote healthy eating, calcium intake and bone development in adolescent girls (United States Department of Agriculture). The Healthy Weight in Adolescents study, a randomized, multi-center study of the effects of a science-based curriculum focused on concepts of energy balance on body weight and composition in adolescent boys and girls (United States Department of Agriculture). The KNEE study, a randomized clinical trial of the effects of resistance exercise on disease progression, pain, and functional capacity in osteoarthritis patients (National Institutes of Health). The STRONG study, a randomized clinical trial of the effects of resistance exercise and Remicaid on disease progression, pain, muscle strength and functional capacity in rheumatoid arthritis patients (Centocor, Inc.). Partners for Healthy Active Children, Campañeros Para Niños Sano y Actives, designed to create and implement research-based physical education and nutrition curricula at YMCA after-school programs and Sunnyside District elementary schools, in alignment with the State o Arizona , Health and Physical Activity standards (Carol M. White Physical Education Program CFDA #84.215F). Longitudinal Changes in Hip Geometry, an observational and experimental cohort study of changes in muscle mass, hip structural parameters and hip bone strength in middle-aged and older women in the Women's Healthy Initiative study (National Institutes of Health).

Publications

Going, S. B., Chen, Z., Alexander, G. E., Mandarino, L. J., Garcia, D. O., Bea, J. W., Raichlen, D. A., & Klimentidis, Y. C. (2017). Genome-wide association study of habitual physical activity in over 277,000 UK Biobank participants indentifies novel variants and genetic correlations with chronotype and obesity related traits. International Journal of Obesity.
BIO5 Collaborators
Zhao Chen, Scott B Going, Yann C Klimentidis
Klimentidis, Y. C., Bea, J. W., Lohman, T. G., Hsieh, P. S., Going, S. B., & Chen, Z. (2015). Resistance exercise intervention results in less weight loss among individuals at high genetic risk for obesity. International Journal of Obesity, 39(9), 1371-1375.
BIO5 Collaborators
Zhao Chen, Scott B Going, Yann C Klimentidis
Farr, J. N., Funk, J. L., Chen, Z., Lisse, J. R., Blew, R. M., Lee, V. R., Laudermilk, M., Lohman, T. G., & Going, S. B. (2011). Skeletal Muscle Fat Content Is Inversely Associated With Bone Strength in Young Girls. JOURNAL OF BONE AND MINERAL RESEARCH, 26(9), 2217-2225.
BIO5 Collaborators
Janet L Funk, Scott B Going
Story, M., Stevens, J., Evans, M., Cornell, C. E., Juhaeri, ., Gittelsohn, J., Going, S. B., Clay, T. E., & Murray, D. M. (2001). Weight loss attempts and attitudes toward body size, eating, and physical activity in American Indian children: Relationship to weight status and gender. Obesity Research, 9(6), 356-363.

PMID: 11399782;Abstract:

Objective: This study examined dieting, weight perceptions, and self-efficacy to eat healthy foods and engage in physical activity and their relationships to weight status and gender among American Indian elementary schoolchildren. Data for this study were collected as part of the baseline examination for the Pathways study. Participants were 1441 second-through third-grade American Indian children in 41 schools representing seven tribes in Arizona, New Mexico, and South Dakota who filled out a questionnaire and had heights and weights taken. Forty-two percent of the children were overweight or obese. No differences were found between overweight/ obese and normal weight children for healthy food intentions or self-efficacy. Heavier children (especially those with body mass index > 95th percentile) were more likely to have tried to lose weight or were currently trying to lose weight. No gender differences were found. Normal weight children chose a slightly heavier body size as most healthy compared with overweight/obese children. The results indicate that children are concerned about their weight and that weight modification efforts are common among overweight American Indian children. School, community, and family-based programs are needed to help young people adopt lifelong healthful eating and physical activity practices.

Harris, M. M., Houtkooper, L. B., Stanford, V. A., Parkhill, C., Weber, J. L., Flint-Wagner, H., Weiss, L., Going, S. B., & Lohman, T. G. (2003). Dietary Iron Is Associated with Bone Mineral Density in Healthy Postmenopausal Women. Journal of Nutrition, 133(11), 3598-3602.

PMID: 14608080;Abstract:

Healthy nonsmoking postmenopausal women (n = 242; ages 40-66 y) were included in the Bone, Estrogen, and Strength Training (BEST) Study. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured at five sites (lumbar spine L2-L4, trochanter, femur neck, Ward's triangle and total body) using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Mean nutrient intakes were assessed using a 3-d diet record. Regression models were calculated using each BMD site as the dependent variable and iron as the independent variable. Covariates included in the models were years past menopause, fat-free mass, fat mass, use of hormone replacement therapy, total energy intake and dietary intake of protein and calcium. Using linear models, iron was associated with greater BMD at all sites (P ≤ 0.01), even after adjusting for protein and/or calcium. Increasing levels of iron intake (>20 mg) were associated with greater BMD at several bone sites among women with a mean calcium intake of 800-1200 mg/d. Elevated iron intake was not associated with greater BMD among women with higher (>1200 mg/d) or lower calcium intakes (