Anthony Bosco

Anthony Bosco

Associate Professor, Immunobiology
Associate Research Scientist
Member of the Graduate Faculty
Primary Department
Department Affiliations
Contact
520-621-9114

Work Summary

Work Summary

I am currently appointed as Associate Professor of Immunobiology, and Associate Research Scientist, Asthma and Airway Disease Research Center (A2DRC), College of Medicine, The University of Arizona. My main areas of expertise include immunology and systems biology/genomic data analysis in the context of respiratory disease, allergy, and various modalities of immunotherapy. My research program is underpinned by the concept that genes do not exist nor function in isolation, they function as components of an interconnected system. My lab has performed the first studies to identify allergen-induced and rhinovirus-induced gene network patterns that underpin the pathogenesis of asthma and related traits. The long-term goal of this work is to unlock the basic immune mechanisms and principles that govern the early origins of asthma and identify novel pathways for therapeutic intervention.

 

Research Interest

Associate Professor Anthony Bosco, PhD, is an expert in Immunobiology and Systems Biology. His research program is underpinned by the concept that genes do not exist nor function in isolation, they function as components of an interconnected system. Understanding the organization and behavior of these systems is an essential goal towards decoding the role of the immune system in health versus disease. Dr Bosco’s laboratory employs cutting-edge molecular profiling technologies and computational analyses to identify the gene networks that underpin the pathogenesis of asthma and allergic diseases. For instance, he discovered that children with severe asthma attacks can be divided into two molecular phenotypes called IRF7hi and IRF7lo. Notably, these phenotypes have distinct responses to bacterial lysate immunotherapy, which paves the way for the development of precision medicine approaches for the treatment or prevention of asthma attacks in children. He has also employed systems biology to understand how allergen-specific immunotherapies produce an effect in the body on a molecular and systems level to switch off allergies.