In The News

NEWS
Experts were asked about why women are left out of research populations and what is being done to address the issue. “There are sex differences in immune responses, drug metabolism and disease states. Some differences are mediated by hormonal differences and others by other biological factors,” explained Dr. Elizabeth Connick, BIO5 member, professor, and chief of the division of infectious diseases at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. “It is essential to include women in research studies so that they can benefit from the results of research in the same way as men,” Dr. Connick said in an interview.
NEWS
Dr. Juanita Merchant, BIO5 member, professor, and chief of Gastroenterology at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson, is a gastric cancer expert whose research focuses on the molecular mechanisms of the disease. Dr. Merchant led a team of University of Arizona Health Sciences researchers who discovered a promising new biomarker that can be identified through a simple blood test, that may help with early detection of the disease and lead to better treatment.
NEWS
Dr. Judith Su runs the UArizona Little Sensor Lab, where researchers are working to sense tiny amounts – down to a single molecule – of everything from doping agents to biomarkers for cancer, Alzheimer's disease, Lyme disease and, yes, even COVID-19. Dr. Su, biomedical engineering and optical sciences professor and a member of the BIO5 Institute, has received a $1.82 million, five-year Maximizing Investigators' Research Award from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, which is part of the National Institutes of Health.
NEWS
One of the most significant questions about the novel coronavirus is whether people who are infected are immune from reinfection and, if so, for how long. Drs. Deepta Bhattacharya and Janko Nikolich-Žugich, University of Arizona Health Sciences researchers and members of BIO5 Institute, determined the answer by studying the production of antibodies from a sample of nearly 6,000 people. Finding showed that immunity persists for at least several months after being infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.
NEWS
Tropical forests may be more resilient to predicted temperature increases under global climate change than previously thought, a study published in the journal Nature Plants suggests. The group led by Dr. Scott Saleska, UArizona professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, studied data from the rainforest habitat at UArizona's Biosphere 2 and compared them to measurements taken at natural tropical forest sites. The results could help make climate prediction models more accurate.
NEWS
Dr. Purnima Madhivanan, UArizona Zuckerman College of Public Health associate professor and BIO5 member, will lead a National Institute on Aging funded study on the effects of Senior Yoga practice on health among elderly populations in low-income communities. Her research seeks to adapt an evidence-based yoga lifestyle program for primary care settings in India, and implement it in the future with local populations in Tucson
NEWS
The quest to protect Arizona’s quality of life under the scorch of record breaking heat, drought, and increasing wildfires is a constant chore. A slate of experts in Tucson, including Biosphere 2 director and BIO5 member Dr. Joaquin Ruiz, offered up recommendations on how Arizona can rise above the heat to keep the economy and the environment thriving.
NEWS
Menopause is a “state of accelerated aging” that can significantly affect health in many ways, says BIO5 member and UArizona professor in the Department of Physiology, Dr. Heddwen Brooks. It’s known that prior to menopause, women generally have lower blood pressure than men. They also have greater protection against cardiovascular disease—the leading cause of death worldwide—as well as kidney disease and diabetic complications. The opposite is true after menopause and Dr. Brooks' research seeks to understand why.
NEWS
A new study by the University of Arizona is looking into COVID-19 immunity, which includes how long it will last and if you can get it more than once. Dr. Jeff Burgess, UArizona Associate Dean of Research and BIO5 member, along with other researchers said just because you've had COVID-19, doesn't mean you're in the clear. According to the CDC, there are no confirmed to date of a person being reinfected with COVID-19 within three months of initial infection. The CDC also said, if a person has recovered and has new symptoms the person may need an evaluation for re-infection.
NEWS
On campus at the University of Arizona, researchers are trying to crack the cancer code. With the help of a grant from the American Cancer Society Dr. Jacob Schwartz, BIO5 member and assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, is taking a closer look at the the behavior of the childhood cancer, Ewing Sarcoma. Dr. Schwartz also says it is helping them understand other cancers along the way.
NEWS
A new study authored by Dr. Michael Worobey, UArizona Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology head and BIO5 member, tracks the spread of coronavirus through North America and Europe. The study investigates when, where, and how COVID-19 established itself globally, using airline passenger flow data, disease incidence rates, and genomic sequence data.
NEWS
SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, can relieve pain, according to a new study by University of Arizona researchers. The finding may explain why nearly half of all people who get COVID-19 experience few or no symptoms, even though they are able to spread the disease, according to the study's corresponding author Dr. Rajesh Khanna, UArizona College of Medicine – Tucson's Department of Pharmacology professor and member of the BIO5 Institute.
NEWS
Study demonstrates that menopause-induced changes to protective immune cells might contribute to the sharp increase in high blood pressure among postmenopausal women. These findings may also have implications for sex differences in COVID-19 responses.
NEWS
Dr. Michael D.L. Johnson, UArizona Immunobiology assistant professor and BIO5 member, discusses why he participated in the virtual ‘Black In Microbiology Week’ event this week. Dr. Johnson also shares about his outreach towards connecting Black, Indigenous and other undergraduate students of color to academic mentors.
NEWS
Sinus infections are one of the most common illnesses, so identifying the progression of the common cold to chronic disease lasting longer than 12 weeks is critical in creating therapies that slow the development of a disease affecting nearly 12% of U.S. adults each year. A group lead by Dr. Eugene Chang, vice chair and associate professor in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the UArizona College of Medicine, was awarded $2.24 million to study a protein in the respiratory tract with a genetic variation strongly associated with these ailments.
NEWS
UArizona Health Sciences professor and BIO5 member Dr. Cynthia Thomson, recently helped update the American Cancer Society's guidelines on cancer prevention lifestyle habits that could save lives. These guidelines cover the simple yet meaningful ways in which diet and physical activity can help people reduce their personal risks for developing cancer.
NEWS
University of Arizona Health Sciences researchers are moving closer to conducting clinical trials on what would be the first therapeutic drug for vascular cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID), the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimer’s disease. Research by Meredith Hay, PhD, a UArizona professor of physiology, and member of the BIO5 Institute and the Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Institute, may offer a remedy for vascular dementia. To date, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has not approved any drugs that specifically treat vascular dementia, which involves cognitive impairment caused by injuries – often stroke related – to the vessels supplying blood to the brain.
NEWS
While many of us have been working from home this summer, several species of insects and plants have been acting out fascinating plays of interactions and mutual interdependence across campus. Dr. Judith Bronstein, UArizona Distinguished Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and BIO5 member, discusses what we can learn from these mutualistic interactions and how she studies insect dynamics.