In The News

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May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month, and our BIO5 researchers are working to better prevent and diagnose this highly prevalent cancer.
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University of Arizona researchers have developed a harmless bacteria strain to battle bad breath in our furry friends. When administered orally, the additive produces a minty aroma that improves dogs' breath, said inventor Dr. Eric Lyons, who developed the technology with co-inventor Dr. David Baltrus. Both are associate professors in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences School of Plant Sciences and members of the BIO5 Institute.
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Dr. Roberta Brinton, the director of the Center for Innovation in Brain Science at the University of Arizona and BIO5 member discovered the disparities in how women are more likely to develop brain diseases and autoimmune conditions such as Alzheimer's and Multiple Sclerosis.
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In this episode, hosts Dr. Brittany Uhlorn and Brooke Moreno talk with Dr. Uwe Hilgert about BIO5's mission to support and educate the next generation workforce.
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Dr. Joanna Masel professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Arizona and BIO5 member uses mathematical models to better understand evolutionary consequences in biochemistry, genetics, cellular biology, physiology, and ecology.

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Liliana Rounds, a veterinarian turned biotech industry professional turned cancer researcher, is in the home stretch of achieving her lifelong dream of earning a PhD at the University of Arizona Health Sciences, studying a potential biomarker for prostate cancer. In her journey, Rounds returned to UArizona to continue her studies, landing her to the laboratories of BIO5 members Drs. Sadhana Ravishankar and V.K. Viswanathan.
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Launched in 2007 as the brainchild of Dr. Marti Lindsey, Community Engagement Director for the Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center at the UArizona College of Pharmacy, the Keep Engaging Youth in Science (KEYS) program has provided 526 gifted Arizona high school students with the research experience of a lifetime. Through this seven-week summer internship, students engage in basic bioscience and data science research and develop science literacy and presentation skills. 
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In some cases, smartphone-based diagnostics can match expensive and bulky lab equipment for speed and accuracy, while remaining portable enough for field settings.
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Seven graduating University of Arizona seniors will be honored for their extraordinary accomplishments during a series of graduation ceremonies to celebrate the class of 2021. Nominated by faculty and peers, this year's seven student award winners were selected based on their integrity, notable achievements and positive contributions to their families and communities. Among these honorees are Alyssa Jean Peterson, Akshay Nathan, and Daniel Weiland, successful undergraduate researchers in the labs of BIO5 faculty, and all planning to continue their studies in STEM.
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A cross-border investigation of children's susceptibility to asthma and other childhood illnesses in the United States and Mexico is the focus of a new study led by researchers in the Asthma and Airway Disease Research Center at the University of Arizona Health Sciences.
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Like many College of Science students, Haws has been a student researcher during her time at the University of Arizona; she has been a part of Dr. Frans Tax’s lab since she arrived at UArizona. “I am so fortunate to have found Dr. Tax and been accepted into his lab, he is a huge advocate for student success. Being in his lab has given me hands-on experience and the opportunity to apply the knowledge that I am acquiring in my classes. It is much easier to understand the concepts learned in the lecture if you have opportunities to apply them. In addition to the educational benefits I also genuinely enjoy spending time in the lab, the research I do on Arabidopsis thaliana is fascinating.”
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By 2034, U.S. Census data show that the number of Americans age 65 and older will for the first time outnumber those under 18. By 2050, there will be an estimated 2.1 billion people in the world age 65 and older.
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On World Asthma Day, we applaud the innovative and translational lung research conducted by our BIO5 Institute members.
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Chemical insecticides are used extensively to kill pests and thereby limit the harm they cause. However, overreliance on insecticides can promote rapid evolution of insecticide resistance in insect populations. In a new study Dr. Xianchun Li, BIO5 member and insect molecular biologist in the UArizona College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, along with colleagues Wenqing Zhang and Rui Pang, discovered how one insect beats the cost of resistance. The paper focuses on the brown planthopper, a tiny hemipteran insect that is the world’s most destructive pest of rice.
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Dr. Cynthia A. Thompson, BIO5 member and Director of the Canyon Ranch Center for Prevention and Health Promotion, led a study that determined that vegetables like kale, broccoli, and cauliflower contain phytochemicals that inhibit the proliferation of breast cancer cells in women.
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Millions are being vaccinated for COVID-19, but some researchers are looking for new ways to detect it. University of Arizona scientist and BIO5 member Dr. Judith Su, is searching for a method to find the disease at the molecular level. If successful, the coronavirus could be detected through sensors that can deliver results within a minute.
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Bruce Tabashnik, Head of the Department of Entomology and BIO5 member, was the lead researcher for a recent study that showed that the eradication of the pink bollworm, a pest that destroyed cotton crops, was in part to a coordinated effort between researchers, farmers and the cotton industry.
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Emily Merritt, who is pursuing a doctorate in immunobiology, was one of the first students to participate in the Infection and Inflammation as Drivers of Aging, a program funded by a National Institutes of Health T32 training grant, which supports four graduate or post-doctoral students annually. She and four other students presented their research virtually at the inaugural Infection and Inflammation as Drivers of Aging symposium in January. The research topics ranged from chronic inflammatory response to ischemic stroke and tracking antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in aging individuals. Merritt presented on Toxoplasma gondii, a single-celled parasite she studies under the guidance of Dr. Anita Koshy, professor of neurology and BIO5 member.