In the news / Technology Enabled Health

NEWS
Acoustoelectric cardiac imaging, a new, noninvasive cardiac imaging technology developed at the University of Arizona, has been licensed to startup ElectroSonix. Dr. Russell Witte, BIO5 faculty and Medical Imaging professor at the UArizona College of Medicine-Tucson, developed the patented technology that provides improvements over current cardiac imaging technologies such as electroanatomical mapping, which provides low-resolution images that make it difficult to pinpoint the exact location of cardiac arrhythmias.
 
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Dr. Jennifer Barton, University of Arizona professor of biomedical engineering and director of the BIO5 Institute, has been appointed to the National Advisory Council for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, part of the National Institutes of Health. The council advises the leadership of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, or NIBIB, on policies and priorities related to research, training and health information dissemination in the areas of biomedical imaging and engineering.
 
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To better understand biological processes, researchers at the University of Arizona have developed new materials for detecting radioisotopes that provide faster and higher resolution results than today’s generally accepted methods. These materials were developed by a team of researchers including the BIO5 Institute's Dr. Craig Aspinwall professor in the UA Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Biomedical Engineering, and also a member of the Cancer Center and Sarver Heart Center at the UA College of Medicine – Tucson.
 
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A team led by UArizona Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry professor and BIO5 member Dr. Jeffrey Pyun, has developed new lens materials polymers that are stronger, more temperature resistant, transparent to a wider spectral window, and less expensive than the first-generation sulfur plastic developed in 2014. The material could bring consumers affordable access to consumer-grade infrared detectors in products such as autonomous cars and in-home thermal imaging for security or fire protection.
 
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Because of routine PSA testing in older men, cancers that might have gone undetected without ever causing health problems were identified and treated. Dr. Richard Ablin, the pioneer who discovered PSA recognizes some variables to prostate cancer screening that require close attention when evaluating men
 
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Firefighters and advocates from across Arizona gathered Thursday for the first meeting of a state Senate ad hoc committee tasked with tackling the issue of cancer among first responders. During the first meeting, the University of Arizona’s Dr. Jeff Burgess gave a presentation on his nearly 20 years of studying
 
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An easy-to-use, self-administered blood test that quickly could evaluate a person’s radiation exposure would help triage emergency medical treatment in the event of a radiological or nuclear event. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services long has sought ways to monitor a population’s radiation
 
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With the support of a new $3.8 million grant from the National Institute on Aging, a team of researchers, led by UA Department of Psychology professor and BIO5 member Dr. Gene Alexander, will investigate whether near-infrared light could help enhance cognition and reduce Alzheimer's disease risk in older adults. Dr. Ted Trouard, a BIO5 member and UA Biomedical Engineering professor, will serve as a co-investigator on the project.
 
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By using $2.1 million in funding from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, a UArizona team of researchers led by Biomedical Engineering associate professor and BIO5 member Dr. Nan-kuei Chen, is looking to develop faster MR technologies to accommodate challenging patient populations. The research aims to provide higher-resolution images with richer information, giving health care practitioners more information about the stage of a disease and the ability to detect brain signal abnormality for those afflicted with diseases like Parkinson's.
 
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Director of the UA Center for Accelerated Biomedical Innovation, UA COM-T professor, and BIO5 member Dr. Marvin Slepian, has introduced a high-tech device that could change the way we help track, treat, and prevent disease. Manufactured by a company in Boston, BioStamp is a skin patch sensor that documents and measures various body processes such as vital signs, activity, posture, and sleep, that clinicians can monitor to help prevent disease.
 
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People who suffer catastrophic breaks to their long leg bones usually face multiple surgeries, and all too often, amputation. UA COM-T Scientists, led by Orthopedic Surgery professor and BIO5 member Dr. John Szivek, have been working for more than 20 years to improve the treatment protocol by developing new ways to fix broken long bones. These bone healing methods include stem cell therapies, 3D printed scaffolds, and sensors that monitor exercise.
 
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Dr. Irving Kron, a BIO5 member, professor of surgery with the UA College of Medicine - Tucson, and senior associate vice president for UA Health Sciences, has been named the new contact principal investigator (PI) for the UA Health Sciences and Banner Health 'All of Us' research program and precision medicine initiative. In his new role, Dr. Kron will lead the multiple UA and Banner Health established PI leadership teams, which include a team led by fellow BIO5 member Dr. Eric Reiman.
 
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The deadly swollen shoot disease is ravaging cocoa trees across West Africa, where about three-quarters of the world’s cocoa is grown. The disease was identified nearly a century ago, yet scientists, including BIO5 researcher and professor in the UA School of Plant Sciences Dr. Judith Brown, say a cure is years away and early detection methods are only just being introduced. The severity of this devastating disease has been muted, as the Ivory Coast experienced a record cocoa crop year.
 
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A team led by The BIO5 Institute's Roberta Diaz Brinton, PhD, director of the Center for Innovation in Brain Science, received the multi-million dollar grant from the National Institute on Aging. The five-year grant will fund a national multi-site Phase 2 clinical trial to determine the effectiveness of allopregnanalone, or allo, as a treatment for individuals with early-stage Alzheimer’s who carry the genetic risk factor for the disease. This award supports the goals of the National Alzheimer’s Project Act.
 
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A team led by University of Arizona Biomedical Engineering professor and BIO5 researcher, Dr. Jeong-Yeol Yoon, has created a highly sensitive portable detection system capable of spotting norovirus at levels that can make people sick. Dr. Yoon believes that the handheld detection system could be used by governmental officials to analyze local groundwater sources in areas with heavy septic tank usage or even on cruise ships, where the virus is prevalent. 
 
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Many researchers with domain-specific expertise aren't aware of the predictive analytics, classification and visualization tools available, or they aren't fluent enough in the data science language to use them. A group of data-fluent UA researchers that includes BIO5 faculty Drs. Eric Lyons, Vignesh Subbian, and Nirav Merchant, is looking to change this by leading a grassroots effort to provide skills training designed to increase data literacy among researchers.
 
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To better understand biological processes, a UA research team that includes BIO5 faculty member and Chemistry & Biochemistry professor Dr. Craig Aspinwall, has developed new materials for detecting radioisotopes that provide faster and higher resolution results than today’s generally accepted methods. The new technology provides new resolution in radioisotope detection, and offers a more environmentally sound alternative by reducing the hazardous chemical usage and waste that existed in previous methods.
 
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Dr. Kaveh Laksari, UA Assistant Professor of Aerospace-Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering and BIO5 member, along with researchers from Stevens Institute of Technology and Worcester Polytechnic Institute, look at the vulnerabilities of different brain regions and how this can impact the severity of damage from traumatic brain injuries.