Dominic V Mcgrath

Dominic V Mcgrath

Professor, BIO5 Institute
Professor, Chemistry and Biochemistry-Sci
Primary Department
Contact
(520) 626-4690

Research Interest

Research Interest
Dominic Mcgrath, PhD, set forth a program which involves the use of organic synthesis for the design, development, and application of new concepts in macromolecular, supramolecular, and materials chemistry. Research efforts span a number of areas in the chemical sciences and include studies of: 1) chiral dendritic macromolecules and the effect of chiral subunits on dendrimer conformation, 2) photochromic dendrimers and linear polymers which undergo structural changes in response to visible light, 3) liquid crystalline materials based on dendritic and photochromic mesogens, and 4) synthesis of new ligands based on saturated nitrogen heterocycles.A continuing interest remains in the effect of structural perturbations on the properties and functional of dendritic macromolecules. Part of this research addresses the design, synthesis, and study of dendrimeric materials containing chiral moieties in the interior for influencing the conformational order of these 3-dimensional macromolecules. An ultimate goal is to develop materials active for the selective clathration of small guest molecules. Potential applications include chemical separations, sensor technology, environmental remediation, and asymmetric catalysis.Dr. Mcgrath and his lab team recently developed several new classes of dendritic materials containing photochromic subunits. As nature uses light energy to alter function in photoresponsive systems such as photosynthesis, vision, phototropism, and phototaxis, they use light energy to drive gross topological or constitutional changes in fundamentally new dendritic architectures with precisely placed photoresponsive subunits. In short, they can drive dendrimer properties with light stimuli. Two entirely new classes of photoresponsive dendritic macromolecules have been developed and include: 1) photochromic dendrimers and 2) photolabile dendrimers. Dr. Mcgrath anticipates that switchable and degradable dendrimers of this type will have application in small molecule transport systems based on their ability to reversibly encapsulate guest molecules. He continues to develop these materials as potential transport hosts and photoresponsive supramolecular assemblies.

Publications

Kernag, C. A., Bobbitt, J. M., & McGrath, D. V. (1999). Mild and convenient oxidation of aromatic heterocyclic primary alcohols by 4-acetylamino-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxoammonium perchlorate. Tetrahedron Letters, 40(9), 1635-1636.

Abstract:

Hydroxymethyl substituted aromatic heterocycles, including pyridines, furans, and thiophenes, are oxidized to the corresponding aldehydes in excellent yields by 4-acetylamino-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1- oxoammonium perchlorate (1) with minimal workup.

McElhanon, J. R., Wu, M., Escobar, M., & McGrath, D. V. (1996). Toward chiral dendrimers with highly functionalized interiors. Dendrons from synthetic AB2 monomers. Macromolecules, 29(27), 8979-8982.
Burk, M. J., Crabtree, R. H., & McGrath, D. V. (1985). Thermal and photochemical catalytic dehydrogenation of alkanes with [IrH2(CF3CO2)(PR3)2] (R = C6H4F-p and cyclohexyl). Journal of the Chemical Society, Chemical Communications, 1829-1830.

Abstract:

[IrH2(CF3CO2)(Pcy3) 2] (cy = cyclohexyl) catalyses the photochemical dehydrogenation of cyclo-octane both in the presence and absence of a hydrogen-acceptor.

Banister, M., Clark, R., Coiner, E., Geronov, Y., McWilliams, M., Sias, R., Walters, G., & McGrath, D. (2012). Study of a smart polymer medical device, product development obstacles and innovative solutions. Proc. SPIE 8343, Industrial and Commercial Applications of Smart Structures Technologies, 8343(30 March 2012), 83430I. doi:http://doi.org/10.1117/12.915529

Abstract:

The concept is simple, within the pump a pH responsive polymer actuator swells in volume under electrically controlled stimulus. As the actuator swells it presses against a drug reservoir, as the reservoir collapses the drug is metered out to the patient. From concept to finished product, engineering this smart system entailed integration across multiple fields of science and engineering. Materials science, nanotechnology, polymer chemistry, organic chemistry, electrochemistry, molecular engineering, electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering all played a part in solutions to multiple technical hurdles. Some of these hurdles where overcome by tried and true materials and component engineering, others where resolved by some very creative out of the box thinking and tinkering. This paper, hopefully, will serve to encourage others to venture into unfamiliar territory as we did, in order to overcome technical obstacles and successfully develop a low cost smart medical device that can truly change a patient's life. © 2012 SPIE.

McElhanon, J., Wu, M., Escobar, M., & McGrath, D. V. (1996). Synthesis of optically active chiral dendrimers with 1,2-diol linkages. American Chemical Society, Polymer Preprints, Division of Polymer Chemistry, 37(2), 495-496.