In the news / Aging

NEWS
Our genes can have the effect of increasing our risk for certain diseases, or at it turns out, sometimes they can protect us from them. This has turned out to be the case with a Colombian woman in her 70s who should have developed Alzheimer’s disease by her mid-40s, but has an identified a mutation in her genes that is keeping her from not experiencing dementia.
NEWS
In an interview with MD Magazine, Dr. Monica Kraft, Department of Medicine chair at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tucson, detailed her session on interpreting gender sex differences in lung disease, and what clinicians need to know when monitoring and caring for women at risk of asthma.
NEWS
A team led by The BIO5 Institute's Roberta Diaz Brinton, PhD, director of the Center for Innovation in Brain Science, received the multi-million dollar grant from the National Institute on Aging. The five-year grant will fund a national multi-site Phase 2 clinical trial to determine the effectiveness of allopregnanalone, or allo, as a treatment for individuals with early-stage Alzheimer’s who carry the genetic risk factor for the disease. This award supports the goals of the National Alzheimer’s Project Act.
NEWS
A new study led by scientists at the UA has uncovered a potential new way to treat patients with ALS, a debilitating neurodegenerative disease. “The fact that we uncovered a compensatory mechanism surprised me,” says UA Molecular and Cellular Biology professor and BIO5 researcher Dr. Daniela Zarnescu.
NEWS
A team of UA researchers including Director of the Evelyn F Mcknight Brain Institute Dr. Carol Barnes, and UA Physiology professor Dr. Meredith Hay, both BIO5 faculty, have proposed a precision aging model designed to help researchers better understand and treat age-related cognitive decline on an individual level.
NEWS
Every 65 seconds, someone in the United States develops Alzheimer's. "And once it begins, it's something that unfortunately we can't stop," said Dr. Matt Grilli, director at University of Arizona's Human Memory Lab. Now scientists are starting to get a clearer picture of the disease.
NEWS
To understand our ability to remember changes as we age in hopes of improving it, and preventing Alzheimer's disease and dementia, researchers including Dr. Carol Barnes, Director of the Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Institute and BIO5 faculty member, envision a field of "precision aging.”
NEWS
By studying a rare form of dementia along with scientists at University of Toronto's Baycrest Health Sciences Centre, a team lead by UA Speech, Language & Hearing Sciences Assistant Professor and BIO5 Member Dr. Aneta Kielar, might have found an early detection method for some forms of dementia.
NEWS
Arizona researchers including the BIO5 Institute's Dr. Eric Reiman, Executive Director of Banner Alzheimer’s Institute in Phoenix, contributed to a recent study of former pro football players in an effort to diagnose a degenerative brain disease in living patients.
NEWS
BIO5's Dr. Roberta Diaz Brinton, an internationally recognized expert on Alzheimer’s disease and Inaugural Director of the Center for Innovation in Brain Science at UAHS, has received a five-year, $1.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health Institute on Aging. With the funding, Brinton will develop a unique training program to cultivate a diverse pool of highly trained scientists from diverse fields who can effectively address the nation’s Alzheimer’s research needs.
NEWS
Dr. Gene Alexander, UA Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry and BIO5 member, is researching the use of neuroimaging, or brain scans, to investigate who is likely to develop Alzheimer's disease.
NEWS
Within the next 10 years, precision medicine - treatment based on an individual's genetics, lifestyle and environment - could help health-care providers better treat all diseases. BIO5 Faculty Dr. Kenneth Ramos, an internationally recognized expert on genetics and genomic medicine, will deliver the conference keynote address for the 17th Annual Living Healthy With Arthritis Conference.
NEWS
Women tend to have more youthful brains than their male counterparts — at least when it comes to metabolism. The finding is "great news for many women," says BIO5's Dr. Roberta Diaz Brinton, the Director of the UA Center for Innovation in Brain Science, but she cautions that even though women's brain metabolism is higher overall, some women's brains experience a dramatic metabolic decline around menopause, leaving them vulnerable to Alzheimer's.
NEWS
Imaging and genomic technologies have dramatically increased the amount of information generated and used to make clinical decisions for diseases like Alzheimer's. “There is an untapped opportunity to leverage existing data from longitudinal cohorts, from the postmortem human brain, and from clinical trials to help the field advance our shared goals more effectively than we otherwise could,” said BIO5 member Dr. Eric Reiman, Executive Director of the Banner Alzheimer’s Institute.
NEWS
Dr. Roberta Diaz Brinton, BIO5 member and inaugural Director for the UA Center for Innovation in Brain Science joins fellow advocates for the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's Disease, including Maria Shriver, in a nationwide plea for elected officials, candidates, and all Americans to prioritize a future without Alzheimer's.
NEWS
BIO5 researcher Dr. Janko Nikolich-Zugich, who leads the Department of Immunobiology at the UA College of Medicine—Tucson and the Arizona Center on Aging, is investigating why the immune system works effectively for some people and fails for others.
NEWS
A UA research team is trying to solve the mystery behind amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease. BIO5's molecular biologist Dr. Daniela Zarnescu is using a catalog of genetic information to sift through a list of drugs that could provide clues to successfully battle the disease.
NEWS
In an effort to find novel ways of boosting the immune systems of aging adults, UA scientists, including BIO5's Dr. Janko Nikolich-Zugich, co-director of the UA Center on Aging, have found that the virus cytomegalovirus (CMV) appears to strengthen the body's immune defenses.
NEWS
A new blood test, the IsoPSA, showed promise in trials to more accurately diagnose prostate cancer. Dr. Richard J. Ablin, BIO5 researcher, member of the Arizona Cancer Center, and Professor at the UA College of Medicine—Tucson, performed research in hopes of finding an antigen specific to the prostate for use in a blood test for prostate cancer screening, which led to the discovery of PSA in 1970.
NEWS
Recent research on head trauma has been focused on NFL athletes, whose brains have been shown to be damaged after years of hits to the heads. A team of Chicago researchers and domestic violence advocates will travel to Phoenix to learn how to better assess survivors of brain injuries from BIO5's Dr. Jonathan Lifshitz, director of the University of Arizona’s College of Medicine’s Translational Neurotrauma Research Program.
NEWS
People with the rare disease called primary progressive aphasia may recruit intact brain areas for help with language, according to a new UA-led study. Aneta Kielar, BIO5 member and UA assistant professor of speech, language and hearing sciences and of cognitive science, is first author on the study.
NEWS
Dr. Kristian Doyle, BIO5 member and Assistant Professor in the UA Department of Immunobiology, has discovered this liquefied brain tissue is toxic and can slowly leak into the healthy portion of the brain, causing harm. The discovery may help develop new treatments to prevent dementia after stroke.
NEWS
It's not concussions, but rather repetitive hits to the head, that cause traumatic brain injury in football players says a new study headed by the BIO5 Institute's Dr. Jonathan Lifshitz.
NEWS
New research conducted by a team of researchers under BIO5 Institute's Dr. Monica Kraft may hold hope of relief for those suffering from debilitating chronic inflammation.
NEWS
A coalition of researchers, including BIO5's Dr. Janko Nikolich-Zugich and several others from the UA, have received a $10 million grant over five years to conduct research on the human immune system and aging.
NEWS
A new study says menopause causes metabolic changes in the brain that could increase the risk of Alzheimer’s in women. The BIO5 Institute's Dr. Roberta Diaz Brinton, director of the UA Center for Innovation in Brain Science, is one of the researchers on the study.
NEWS
Studying the aging brain's susceptibility to Alzheimer's Disease, BIO5's Dr. Roberta Brinton discovered dramatic differences between how female and male brains generate the energy they need as the brain ages.
NEWS
Research shows that only a small portion people will experience severe dementia as they get older. “That means 86 percent of us age normally,” says Dr. Carol Barnes of the BIO5 Institute.