Episode 23: Culture counts

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Dr. Paloma Beamer discusses why it's important to take a culturally-centered approach to understanding how vulnerable populations, including Native Americans, are affected by environmental contaminants.
Dr. Brittany Uhlorn, BIO5 Institute

The University of Arizona is on the land and territories of Indigenous Peoples, and today, Arizona is home to 22 federally recognized tribes, with Tucson being home to the O'odham and the Yaqui.

There is a disproportionate burden of contaminant exposure in underserved populations like Native Americans, and because their culture and traditions are closely woven with the environment, special strategies must be used to study and help these groups. Dr. Paloma Beamer, professor of public health, research scientist in the Asthma and Airway Disease Research Center, and director of the Community Engagement Core at the Southwest Environmental Health Sciences Center, shares how she takes a culturally-informed approach to conducting research with and devising interventions for Indigenous Peoples.


LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT We respectfully acknowledge the University of Arizona is on the land and territories of Indigenous peoples. Today, Arizona is home to 22 federally recognized tribes, with Tucson being home to the O’odham and the Yaqui. Committed to diversity and inclusion, the University strives to build sustainable relationships with sovereign Native Nations and Indigenous communities through education offerings, partnerships, and community service.