In the news / Genomics

NEWS
Our genes can have the effect of increasing our risk for certain diseases, or at it turns out, sometimes they can protect us from them. This has turned out to be the case with a Colombian woman in her 70s who should have developed Alzheimer’s disease by her mid-40s, but has an identified a mutation in her genes that is keeping her from not experiencing dementia.
 
NEWS
UA CALS researchers including BIO5 members Drs. Shane Burgess and Patricia Stock, explain the advantages of having a complete genome description of its academic beef herd, after an SNP (single nucleotide polymorphisms) typing project was completed this past May at the V Bar V Agricultural Experiment Station in Coconino County. The goal is to use the extensive data, to help cattle growers improve production by giving them an affordable method for identifying predictable and specific genetic traits in cows.
 
NEWS
Swollen Shoot disease is affecting cacao trees in Ghana. UA Plant Sciences professor Dr. Judith Brown, notes that the disease is threatening to affect the supply of chocolate. Dr. Brown is using genome sequencing technology to look deeper into the viruses found to cause damage in cacao plant samples.
 
NEWS
After nine years of work, an international consortium of scientists, including UA Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology associate professor and BIO5 faculty member Dr. Mike Barker, has released gene sequences for more than 1100 plant species. The massive undertaking is part of the One Thousand Plant Transcriptomes Initiative (1KP), a global collaboration to examine plant species, genes and genomes diversification back to the ancestors of flowering plants and green algae.
 
NEWS
A Tucson startup with technology to help fish farmers boost production were one of two grand prize winners of a business pitch competition at the 2019 edition of IdeaFunding. The founders of GenetiRate, including BIO5’s Dr. Benjamin Renquist shared in the $25,000 grand prize sponsored by UAVenture Capital
 
NEWS
Coinciding with World Food Day, a team of plant scientists from King Abdullah University for Science and Technology (KAUST) established a major project to improve global date palm production and protection.
 
NEWS
Past research claimed that new genes arise when existing ones are accidentally duplicated, blended with others or broken up. Nowadays, researchers including Ecology & Evolutionary Biology professor and BIO5 member Dr. Joanna Masel, are suggesting that some genes do not always evolve from existing ones, but are fashioned from desolate stretches of the genome that do not code for any functional molecules.
 
NEWS
UArizona Pharmacology and Toxicology professor and BIO5 faculty Dr. Donna Zhang, leads her lab to examine how chronic exposure to arsenic causes genetic changes linked to disease development. By using QIAGEN Genomic Services, the team discovered that arsenic and high-fat diets induce similar transcriptomic changes. Through this analysis, the team also found that when a set of master regulator RNA molecules had been inactivated, there were fewer arsenic-induced dietary changes.
 
NEWS
New DNA analysis conducted by BIO5 faculty member and University of Arizona Plant Sciences professor Dr. Judith Brown, along with researchers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, has found genetic diversity in predatory pest, Vampirovibrio chlorellavorus. This discovery complicates efforts to protect algae ponds used in the biofuels industry from destructive algae strains and pests.
 
NEWS
Scientists lead by The BIO5 Institute's Dr. Michael Worobey at the University of Arizona were able to extract from the tissue a nearly complete genetic sequence of an HIV virus — the oldest nearly full-length genetic code for an HIV-1 virus recovered thus far, and one that supports the theory that the virus that causes AIDS began to transmit among people within the first decade or two of the 20th century.
 
NEWS
Scientists at the UA, led by Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department Head and BIO5 Microbiome Associate Director Dr. Michael Worobey, were able to extract from the tissue a nearly complete genetic sequence of an HIV virus — the oldest nearly full-length genetic code for an HIV-1 virus recovered thus far, supporting the theory that HIV began to transmit among people within the first two decades of the 20th century.
 
NEWS
Dr. Marvin Slepian, clinician-scientist-engineer-inventor and founding Director of the Arizona Center for Accelerated Biomedical Innovation, and Dr. Rod Wing, Bud Antle Endowed Chair Professor for Excellence in Agriculture in the School of Plant Sciences and Director of the Arizona Genomics Institute, both BIO5 members, have been named UA Regents Professors by the Arizona Board of Regents.
 
NEWS
The Flinn Foundation awarded the Division of Clinical Data Analytics and Decision Support (CDADS) at the UA College of Medicine - Phoenix $1.5 million to incorporate pharmacogenomics and clinical decision support into clinician training and medical practice. BIO5's Dr. Raymond Woosley, is Co-Director of the Division of Clinical Data Analytics and Decision Support.
 
NEWS
The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, has identified a polio-like virus as a potential cause of an outbreak of a disease known as Acute Flaccid Myelitis (AFM), a crippling condition that causes muscle weakness and paralysis usually among children. Dr. Bonnie LaFleur, UA Professor of Biostatistics and BIO5 member, aided in data analysis for the study.
 
NEWS
Research from the UA College of Engineering shows a way for light to control neurons in the brain, which may lead to doctors being able to turn off pain receptors or reduce the effects of neurological disorders. UA Biomedical Engineering Professor and BIO5 member, Dr. Philipp Gutruf, recently published a paper in the science journal Nature Electronics about his work with an implantable, battery-free, light-emitting diode.
 
NEWS
A team of UA scientists hope they have made progress toward a next-generation drug that may slow tumor growth and boost radiation’s effectiveness in patients with glioblastoma, a deadly brain cancer. The team includes BIO5 member Dr. Michael Hammer, Co-Director of the UA Cancer Center Genomics Shared Resource.
 
NEWS
The BIO5 Institute's Dr. Michael Worobey has reconstructed the genome of the Spanish Flu from century old blood samples. The University of Arizona scientist had connected with a man named Jim Cox. And Cox just so happened to have in his possession a collection of human tissue slides had handed down through the generations. Those slides, it turns out, could now help rewrite the history of the 1918 Spanish flu — altering our understanding of when it began and how it spread.
 
NEWS
A team of University of Arizona researchers who looked for genetic differences between glioblastoma cells from long- and short-term survivors discovered that those who survived longer had a protein that might be targeted to increase survival in all glioblastoma patients. The results were presented this month at the Society for Neuro-Oncology conference in New Orleans. This work is in its early stages, and the researchers say they are many years and millions of dollars away from potential translation into treatments for patients.