In the news / Diabetes

NEWS
A team of researchers, including Dr. Philipp Gutruf, BIO5 member and Assistant Professor in the UA Biomedical Engineering Department, have developed an implantable device that can measure oxygen levels in a living animal, which has potential to pave a new avenue for research into physiological and pathological processes.
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A new implantable "teabag" could help children with Type 1 Diabetes. BIO5 member Dr. Klearchos Papas, Professor in the Departments of Surgery and Medical Imaging at the UA College of Medicine – Tucson, and his team have engineered an innovative new biomedical device that could deliver all the benefits of a transplant to resolve diabetes without drawbacks of anti-rejection drugs.
NEWS
The UA received a $1.1 million grant to study the biology underlying the connection between type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. BIO5 member Dr. Yann Klimentidis is a lead researcher on the study, which will utilize publicly available health and genetic information from databases across the world, covering at least 650,000 people.
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Recently there has been debate over whether or not the diabetes — specifically, type 2 — can be “reversed.” According to BIO5's Dr. Yann Klimentidis, assistant professor at the UA College of Public Health, this area of research is still in its infancy but, one day, prevention and treatment measures for type 2 diabetes could eventually be more precise, based on an individual’s genetic profile.
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The Arizona Biomedical Research Commission has recognized 14 researchers from the UA Health Sciences to receive grant awards totaling more than $5.92 million. Eight of those researchers are BIO5 members, including Dr. Frank Duca, Dr. Louise Hecker, Dr. Tally Largent-Milnes, Dr. John Purdy, Dr. Benjamin Renquist, Dr. Todd Vanderah, Dr. Jun Wang, and Dr. Frederic Zenhausern.
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Some people go on diets to lose weight, but what if there's a diet that could help save your life? Researchers at the UA, led by BIO5 member Dr. Donato Romagnolo, say eating a "Mediterranean diet" reduces the risk for cancer.
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BIO5 members Donato Romagnolo, PhD, and Ornella Selmin, PhD, of the UA Cancer Center and College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, delve into current research to examine how the Mediterranean diet is connected to the prevention of several chronic diseases, including colorectal cancer and breast cancer.
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The Wearable Robotics Association’s WearRAcon 16 conference in Phoenix showcased the next frontier of wearable technology for military and medicine. BIO5 member Dr. David Armstrong was in attendance, specifically to educate on the benefits of wearable technology for diabetes patients.
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We have yet to find a cure for most human neurodegenerative disorders. However, because all of these diseases share a common underlying mechanism, BIO5 researcher Dr. Tricia Serio believes that we will soon be able to halt and reverse their progression — by way of baker’s yeast.
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Telemedicine, phone based consults and video conferences, is more and more widely used in the medical community. BIO5's Dr. David Armstrong weighs in, “As we move from volume-based care to value-based care, telemedicine is going to become more valuable.
NEWS
A common genetic variant may increase the risk of a high body mass index by increasing the amount of time a person spends sitting, according to a new study. "This is an exciting time in science especially with respect to understanding the genetic basis of disease. There has been an explosion in our knowledge of the genes involved in susceptibility to obesity," said UA researcher and lead author Dr. Yann Klimentidis.
NEWS
From 2006 to 2010, more than 1 million patients went to the emergency room for diabetes-related foot complications, and 10.5 percent of those involved an amputation, according to a new study. BIO5's Dr. David Armstrong weighs in on prevention tips.
NEWS
We’re heading towards a day when a barely detectable system of sensors could make communicating with health care providers easy, or even let our bodies do the communicating for us. Ideally these objects will help trigger healthy decisions and inform healthy choices. BIO5's Drs. Bijan Najafi and Esther Sternberg are among UA researchers tapping the potential of wearable technologies aimed at enhancing personal health and well-being, as well as doctor/patient communications.